Without a Roof

"Poverty is the worst form of violence." -- Mahatma Gandhi

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When Need Knocks At Our Door

By Patty Moore

I stand in old shoes, with an airy toe,
my dress tattered slightly, my head hanging low.

You see me, and surely, you’ve heard and you know,
my husband’s laid off or work has been slow.

The greetings are fake, with a grin plastered on.
A hug and a pat; God bless you, so long.

No offers of shelter, food or employment,
my family departs with such disappointment.

Jesus said, “Among you will always be the poor.”
Lord, let us remember, when need knocks at out door.

When we give, let us give in sincere humility,
not to impress men, but for His eyes to see.

In abundance, let us not store, our treasures at home,
that the needy might glorify Him without groan.

Lord, open our eyes to the homeless and poor.
Let us help when need knocks at our door.
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Wayward Souls Seeking Safe Ground Outdoors in Chico California

"If money is your God watch and see what he does for you." — ramblings of a mentally ill homeless woman.

"I had an unexpected visitor last night. He&#8217;s a good guy he just needs more space than I have over there." &#8212; A woman&#8217;s response to how she slept.

It’s two a.m. and a woman is rambling profusely against all manners of injustice. Thirty minutes later she leaves blanket in hand towing a wheeled suitcase, while a woman randomly coughs at the full force of her lungs as if she is bringing up a hair ball.

A drunk guy stands over me at 2:30 a.m. telling me he usually sleeps where I am resting. He asks for water, mumbles some more, and stumbles away. He’s now sitting over by a glass door entrance, head in hand, talking to himself. I faintly hear, “got any Vicodin?” His voice rises, “they’re fake people — “they’re all fake people.” He’s up now rummaging  through the trash. Lingering a bit he shuffles past. A piercing “fuck” rings in the distance followed by hand claps. He’s in the parking lot… he’s gone, his dalliances replaced with the faint sound of snoring.

It’s 3:15 a.m. and he’s back on the far side of the courtyard talking to someone responding in laughter. I spy a regular guest with a hoodie over his head, hands in pockets… pacing. A man groans nearby.

Grunts, coughs, snores and musings litter the night. At 4 a.m. the rambling woman returns, and at 7 a.m. I let a man use my mobile device to call his sister for a ride to get his meds and some shoes and socks for his bare feet. At 8 a.m. a man apologizes for disturbing the lady that was so upset she had left and later returned. He had unwisely come up on her in the wee hours thinking she was someone else. The apology was a nice gesture for violating her boundaries. He left the area saying, “I hope you accept my apology.” The net is both the women in my immediate area had unexpected visitors during the night.

If you have a roof be grateful.

Wayward Souls Seeking Safe Ground Outdoors in Chico California

"If money is your God watch and see what he does for you." — ramblings of a mentally ill homeless woman.

"I had an unexpected visitor last night. He’s a good guy he just needs more space than I have over there." — A woman’s response to how she slept.

It’s two a.m. and a woman is rambling profusely against all manners of injustice. Thirty minutes later she leaves blanket in hand towing a wheeled suitcase, while a woman randomly coughs at the full force of her lungs as if she is bringing up a hair ball.

A drunk guy stands over me at 2:30 a.m. telling me he usually sleeps where I am resting. He asks for water, mumbles some more, and stumbles away. He’s now sitting over by a glass door entrance, head in hand, talking to himself. I faintly hear, “got any Vicodin?” His voice rises, “they’re fake people — “they’re all fake people.” He’s up now rummaging through the trash. Lingering a bit he shuffles past. A piercing “fuck” rings in the distance followed by hand claps. He’s in the parking lot… he’s gone, his dalliances replaced with the faint sound of snoring.

It’s 3:15 a.m. and he’s back on the far side of the courtyard talking to someone responding in laughter. I spy a regular guest with a hoodie over his head, hands in pockets… pacing. A man groans nearby.

Grunts, coughs, snores and musings litter the night. At 4 a.m. the rambling woman returns, and at 7 a.m. I let a man use my mobile device to call his sister for a ride to get his meds and some shoes and socks for his bare feet. At 8 a.m. a man apologizes for disturbing the lady that was so upset she had left and later returned. He had unwisely come up on her in the wee hours thinking she was someone else. The apology was a nice gesture for violating her boundaries. He left the area saying, “I hope you accept my apology.” The net is both the women in my immediate area had unexpected visitors during the night.

If you have a roof be grateful.


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Denise Dahl’s struggle with the perceived theft of her dog by Chico Police on 8/27/2014

I’m not a black magic witch, a levitator or a home wrecker.” — Denise Dahl

Denise Dahl has lived outside in Chico California about a decade and is an avid purveyor of rocks, both naturally occurring and artifacts. She has multiple stash locations and excavating sites and is well known in the local community of gem and rock collectors.



Back in early September I showed Denise Dahl (DD) the picture of her dog Lolita nestled against her face while attending Chico’s Church on the Street in late August. DD’s face was instantaneously crestfallen and agitated at seeing the picture. “The cops took my fucking dog,” was her response.

She was in tears yesterday when I showed her a full page black and white copy of the picture that was included in a complaint filed with Chico Police at the end of the Advisory Board Meeting.

Initial conversation on this matter from September 2, 2014….

Q: “How are you getting your dog back?”
A: “I don’t know — I don’t want to call the cops on the cops and tell on him. I know she is in the cop’s house. He teased me about taking her and how his little girl would love her. He said if I got help for my problems I could always get my dog back. I was in jail four hours, sighted and released. I made a beeline to the animal shelter the next day and she wasn’t there. I freaked out and then realized he took her home — he has my dog at his house. I believe that to be true to the fullest, I truly believe that. He told me he was going to take her in one of the ways that he used to abuse me. I can also tell you that Lolita is registered to me.”

"I also complained in booking about it saying, ‘can he take my dog, because he was being pretty abusive about saying he was going to take her home and that homeless people don’t deserve dogs’"

DD went on to describe how she received her dog Lolita from her last male-stalker as a way of making amends in his Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) twelve step program. She had the dog about 6-weeks.

Q:"How many times have you been stalked by men on the streets?" A: “I can’t count that high. Since I got to Chico I have gotten used to the fact that someone is following me all the time. I’ll turn-around to stalk the stalker to be sure they know that I know they are following me.”

Denise Dahl’s struggle with the perceived theft of her dog by Chico Police on 8/27/2014

I’m not a black magic witch, a levitator or a home wrecker.” — Denise Dahl

Denise Dahl has lived outside in Chico California about a decade and is an avid purveyor of rocks, both naturally occurring and artifacts. She has multiple stash locations and excavating sites and is well known in the local community of gem and rock collectors.

Back in early September I showed Denise Dahl (DD) the picture of her dog Lolita nestled against her face while attending Chico’s Church on the Street in late August. DD’s face was instantaneously crestfallen and agitated at seeing the picture. “The cops took my fucking dog,” was her response.

She was in tears yesterday when I showed her a full page black and white copy of the picture that was included in a complaint filed with Chico Police at the end of the Advisory Board Meeting.

Initial conversation on this matter from September 2, 2014….

Q: “How are you getting your dog back?”
A: “I don’t know — I don’t want to call the cops on the cops and tell on him. I know she is in the cop’s house. He teased me about taking her and how his little girl would love her. He said if I got help for my problems I could always get my dog back. I was in jail four hours, sighted and released. I made a beeline to the animal shelter the next day and she wasn’t there. I freaked out and then realized he took her home — he has my dog at his house. I believe that to be true to the fullest, I truly believe that. He told me he was going to take her in one of the ways that he used to abuse me. I can also tell you that Lolita is registered to me.”

"I also complained in booking about it saying, ‘can he take my dog, because he was being pretty abusive about saying he was going to take her home and that homeless people don’t deserve dogs’"

DD went on to describe how she received her dog Lolita from her last male-stalker as a way of making amends in his Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) twelve step program. She had the dog about 6-weeks.

Q:"How many times have you been stalked by men on the streets?"
A: “I can’t count that high. Since I got to Chico I have gotten used to the fact that someone is following me all the time. I’ll turn-around to stalk the stalker to be sure they know that I know they are following me.”


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Smurf and his mom struggle with sobriety, shelter and isolation

"Smurf’s mom looks 10-years younger after just 2-weeks in the Torres Community Shelter." — Without a Roof

"I wish I wasn’t homeless and I could get back on track. Society brings the homeless people down. We’re not trying to be homeless we just are. There needs to be a place were homeless people with dogs can go find shelter and rest peacefully. No one accepts people with homeless animals. My dog is my #1 companion and best friend, he’s my baby.” — Smurf 



Smurf says, “Two weeks in the Torres Shelter and my mom looks 1,000% better. She was on her last legs two-weeks ago and I thought she was going to pass. I cried and told all my friends. It really hurt me because no one understood what I was going through, but now she is looking a lot better and she’s found God. She didn’t have God in her heart a long time ago — she’s found God and is doing a lot better. The Torres Shelter definitely helped her.”

Q: “You mentioned that some people were callous saying to the affect not to worry about it because everyone has to die sometime. Can you expand on that?”A: “My friends said that everyone has to die sometime, but my mom doesn’t have to die now, she has to die later. My mom turns 53 birthday in 3 more days and is too young to die, way too young.”

The Torres Community Shelter is located in Chico California providing emergency shelter for men, women and children experiencing homelessness.

Smurf and his mom struggle with sobriety, shelter and isolation

"Smurf’s mom looks 10-years younger after just 2-weeks in the Torres Community Shelter." — Without a Roof

"I wish I wasn’t homeless and I could get back on track. Society brings the homeless people down. We’re not trying to be homeless we just are. There needs to be a place were homeless people with dogs can go find shelter and rest peacefully. No one accepts people with homeless animals. My dog is my #1 companion and best friend, he’s my baby.” — Smurf

Smurf says, “Two weeks in the Torres Shelter and my mom looks 1,000% better. She was on her last legs two-weeks ago and I thought she was going to pass. I cried and told all my friends. It really hurt me because no one understood what I was going through, but now she is looking a lot better and she’s found God. She didn’t have God in her heart a long time ago — she’s found God and is doing a lot better. The Torres Shelter definitely helped her.”

Q: “You mentioned that some people were callous saying to the affect not to worry about it because everyone has to die sometime. Can you expand on that?”
A: “My friends said that everyone has to die sometime, but my mom doesn’t have to die now, she has to die later. My mom turns 53 birthday in 3 more days and is too young to die, way too young.”

The Torres Community Shelter is located in Chico California providing emergency shelter for men, women and children experiencing homelessness.


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I’m Olivia and I happen to have cuts on my arms.

It’s humbling to see such a young and vibrant person deal with so much pain and hurt by inflicting self-harm. Olivia is just someone that wants to be recognized as a person just like you and I, and what a vibrant and beautiful person she is. I am truly blessed to have met and shared space and time with her…

I said, “I know what it’s like to be young and homeless, putting up walls and layers of toughness to survive. I ran away at sixteen.”

Olivia, “Hi five, me too!”


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Chico’s first community Cafe is coming soon - real SOON

Local cafe to launch donations only meals — by Stephanie Schmieding 9/6/2014

100th Monkey Cafe &amp; Books lends a helping hand to the community by providing meals compensated by donations and a volunteer staff…

Click here for the full article at theorion.com

90-second cafe preview at the 100th Monkey… Margo the greeter is a charmer

Chico’s first community Cafe is coming soon - real SOON

Local cafe to launch donations only meals — by Stephanie Schmieding 9/6/2014

100th Monkey Cafe & Books lends a helping hand to the community by providing meals compensated by donations and a volunteer staff…

Click here for the full article at theorion.com

90-second cafe preview at the 100th Monkey… Margo the greeter is a charmer


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